Category Archives: My Dream

Overcoming Challenges

“Life’s challenges are not supposed to paralyze you, they’re supposed to help you discover who you are.” Bernice Johnson Reagon

This quote is especially meaningful for me today since 36-hours ago my laptop computer crashed. All the photos I’ve taken during this trip were on the hard drive, as was the latest version of the book I am writing, my Skype account, and well, pretty much my life.

As you can imagine I was a bit of a mess for about 24-hours. Thank goodness for a friend back in the States who called my French phone and was able to help me calm down and get my perspective back; reminding me, just as the quote by Bernice Johnson Reagon states, I can’t let this paralyze me, or get me down. I must press on!

“Press on. Obstacles are seldom the same size tomorrow as they are today.” – Robert H. Schuller

The next day I saw my friend Catherine and fortunately she had an extra computer I can use until I get mine fixed or purchase a new one. It’s a mac (I use a PC), and it has a French keyboard with many letters in different locations then on an American keyboard. But it has Word and connects to the Internet, so I can at least get online, call home via Skype and take care of some things until I can get a new computer.

I have a fairly recent version of my novel on an external hard drive, so all is not lost.

My dad is a computer wiz, so hopefully when I get home he can help me get the files and pictures off my laptop hard drive.

Obviously this is not the end of the world and I keep reminding myself – I’m in Paris, I’m living my dream. Challenges happen and we can always learn something for them.

So I will take out my notebook and pen, and continue writing my book longhand, like all the writers did before computers and typewriters.

“Without difficulties, life would be like a stream without rocks and curves – about as interesting as concrete. Without problems, there can be no personal growth, no group achievement, no progress of humanity. But what matters about problems is what one does with them.” Benjamin Hoff, The Te Of Piglet

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September 30, 2013 · 2:15 am

Afternoons at the Seaside near Marseille

The coast near Marseille offers an enormous array of seaside spaces catering to every possible taste all along its west-facing southern coastline. Most of the terrain is rocky, but there are some “beaches” with pebbles and a few offer a sandy place to walk in your bare feet.

A number of the beaches have activities as well, these include everything from kayaking, paddle-boarding and snorkeling to beach rugby, and even swimming lessons for kids. And it seems you will always find someone hoping to catch some fish for dinner. One thing to note, there are no bonfires allowed on beach (whether rocky or sandy) due to a high fire danger in the area.

One afternoon Evelyn and I headed over to the seaside but when we arrived the sky was clouded over and it was a bit cool for swimming. We had a nice walk along the rocky cliffs and then found a nice beach to lay our towels down on and relax for a bit. I put my feet in the water, but it was too cold to go all the way in, so I didn’t end up swimming that day.

Small cove

Small cove

Going fishing

Going fishing

Canoeing

Canoeing

Rocky sea scape

Rocky sea scape

Sandy beach

Sandy beach

sandy beach near Marseille

sandy beach near Marseille

Hello!

Hello!

I went to the sea near Marseille on a few occasions while in Provence, and below are some of the pictures from those trips.

Crystal clear!

Crystal clear!

Water activities

Water activities

Beach near the Old Port

Beach near the Old Port

Biking along the water.

Biking along the water.

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I’m certainly no Van Gogh

Number #13 on my France Dream List is to paint or draw a picture, so I bought myself some colored pencils and a pad of paper and I sat down to draw something. I may not be a great artist, but I am freeing my inner child!

Girl in Paris with Bike

Girl in Paris with Bike

I didn’t come up with this Girl in Paris on my own, I found a picture I liked on-line and used it as a reference, doing my best to make my drawing look similar to the original.  It was “close” but the original is much better:

Original Painting by Fifi Flowers

Original Painting by Fifi Flowers

This original is a Watercolor Painting by Fifi Flowers – if you’d like to check out her other work, click here.

I tried another one, this one is completely off the top of my head … no reference piece. Can you tell??

Lavender and Sunflowers

Lavender and Sunflowers

Next I bought myself some oil paints and after watching three or four hours of YouTube videos on Oiling Painting for Beginners, I set up my work station and gave it a go!

My new paint set

My new paint set

Mixing colors

Mixing colors for my sky

Here we  go!

Here we go – there’s the sky !

Add some mountains in the background

Added some mountains in the background

And now for the final picture and my first oil painting ever. Drum roll please… I call it “Rolling Hills of Wheat”.

Rolling hills of wheat

“Rolling hills of Wheat” by Deborah Grinnell

I know it’s not great, but hey, I did it! I’ll sign it once I get a small enough brush to write with and it will be officially finished.

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Marseille: The Old Port and the Sea

Marseille - Old Port

Marseille – Old Port

I spent a couple of days in Marseille this past week, and the weather was perfect – sunny, warm with a light breeze. Located on the southeast coast of France, Marseille is France’s largest city on the Mediterranean coast and largest commercial port. Marseille is the capital of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region.

Getting to Marseille was easy – I just took a bus (about a 40-minute ride) and then transferred to the Metro. Two stops later I was where I wanted to be – right in the center of the Old Port – or Vieux Port.

Old Port Marina

Old Port Marina

As I exited the Metro station the pungent smell of fish filled the salty air – and I walked right into the daily fish market held on the Quai des Belges. (The scent reminded me of walking down Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco.)

Daily Fish Market

Daily Fish Market

As in many coastal towns, fishing remains important in Marseille and the food economy there is fed by the local catch.

I strolled along the Old Port and admired the beautiful sailing boats, some fishing boats and a few small yachts. There were lines of people waiting to buy tickets to board ferries to Château d’If and the islands, and tourist boats visiting the calanques.  Meanwhile locals sprayed down their boats or otherwise readied themselves for a day on the sea.

Getting ready!

Getting ready!

I noticed these two men taking care of some maintenance on their boat.

Locals doing a little boat maintenance

Locals doing a little boat maintenance

On a hill on the south side of the Old Port is Notre-Dame de la Garde, built on the foundations of an ancient fort located at the highest natural point in Marseille, (490 ft).

Notre-Dame de la Garde

Notre-Dame de la Garde

Notre-Dame de la Garde

Another thing you can’t help but notice in Marseille is the street art. In addition to murals painted on the sides of building, there are Fiberglass animal sculptures painted in wild colors and patterns, and most notably are some very impressive Salvador Dali pieces right there on the Quai.  (More on Marseille’s art scene in a future post.)

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Sculpture by Salvador Dali

One thing I cannot fail to mention is the free Ferry Boat that you can take from one side of the port to the other. It’s great if you want to get off your feet for a few minutes and get out on the water. The views back at the city from the ferry are quite nice. In the summer there is also boat service to Pointe Rouge, the port on the South Side of Marseille.

Free Ferry Boat

Free Ferry Boat

Following are some more photographs I took through the two days I was in this sea-side city – focused on the water… Enjoy!

 parish church of Saint-Laurent and adjoining 17th-century chapel of Sainte-Catherine

Parish church of Saint-Laurent and adjoining 17th-century chapel of Sainte-Catherine

The 12th-century parish church of Saint-Laurent and adjoining 17th-century chapel of Sainte-Catherine, stand quai-side near the Cathedral. It is a fine example of Provençal Romanesque architecture built of pinkish stone from the Couronne quarries.

Heading out to Sea

A view to the Sea

Heading out to Sea

View back to the port as I head out to Sea

Sailors in the distance

Sailors in the distance

Out at Sea

Out at Sea

Sunset at Sea, Marseille

Sunset at Sea, Marseille

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France: Week One – Part Two: AIX en Provence

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As I mentioned in my last post, the first week in France has been quite an experience.

Being in Paris was wonderful and I know that was because everything was familiar to me. I’ve taken the bus and the Metro many times all around the city with no issues. I’ve ambled down the large boulevards, sat in cafés and people watched, and I’ve navigated many train stations.

But mostly I think I had such an easy adjustment in Paris because I had my friend Catherine as a companion, who took care of me those first few days, making sure I ate, giving me tips on which bus to take, helping me get my phone, showing me some places I hadn’t seen in Paris before, and speaking French for me when I couldn’t find the words.

But now its time to go to AIX en Provence.  Comfort zone be prepared for expansion!

August 8 – Arriving in AIX en Provence on the train was easy, and Catherine’s friend EveLyne was there to pick me up. I will be staying at her home and house-sitting / cat-sitting while she is on holiday.

EveLyne picked me up curbside in her adorable bright yellow and white Citron DS3; and with a quick greeting, we tossed my bag in the trunk and we were off.

CitronLooking out the car window at my new surroundings I see the South of France countryside with villas, groups of cottages, farmhouses and small villages scattered over the landscape.  There on the horizon, just east of Aix rises the Montagne Sainte-Victoire one of the landmarks of the Pays d’Aix. This mountain was a favorite subject of Paul Cézanne, and he painted its likeness many times throughout his lifetime. (More on Cézanne in a later post.)

mt-sainte-victoire

Montagne Sainte-Victoire

Upon arrival at my new home, EveLyne gave me a brief tour of the house, back yard and pool, then showed me to my room to unpack and get settled in.

Later, EveLyne shared the bus schedules with me so that while I am here I can get along without a car. I thinking, Oh this will be easy! I know how to read a schedule, and I’ve taken the bus and metro all around Paris. (The saying: Famous Last Words now comes to mind.)

I change out of my travel clothes and don a cute summer dress and we head out for a delicious organic meal in the little village near EveLyne’s home. While walking in the village she points out the bus stops so I’ll know exactly where to go. (Note: there is no such thing as “exact” in the South of France, just saying.)

AIX 009

Following dinner we drive into the center of AIX for a look around. EveLyne takes me one of the most popular and lively places in the town, Cours Mirabeau, a wide (mostly) pedestrian street, with double rows of plane-trees and lined with grand homes, shops and restaurants.

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AIX is often referred to as the City of 1000 Fountains, and Cours Mirabeau is decorated with its fair share; the most notable being La Rotonde, a large fountain that makes up a roundabout at one end of the street.

rotande fountain

August 9

Today was purely a vacation day. I just relaxed around the pool, read a little, ate a little – it was wonderful. It’s been years since I did nothing but relax. I even got a suntan!

August 10

Today Evelyn left for her holiday (sailing in the Mediterranean Sea) and I headed off into AIX for a bit of exploring.

I walked to the bus stop, and there was an older French woman there. Being friendly I say, “Bonjour” and she responds in kind.  A minute later, she Lavender 001starts talking to me (in very rapid French), and from what I can make out she is upset because this village closes down in the middle of the day, and other shops closed down for August. Apparently she needed to go shopping as well as to the post office and everything was closed, and on top of that, she wanted to know where the bus was? Why was it late?

Did I mention this is my first day out? I am not fluent in French, she doesn’t speak a word of English and I have no idea why things are closed. So I string a few French phrases together to let her know I am just visiting, and I have no idea why this town closes down, I’m just trying to go to AIX.

The bus finally comes and within ten minutes we arrive in AIX.

I wander aimlessly around the old town, winding through the narrow, cobblestone streets, taking in the sights and sounds of this beautiful city. I’m just thrilled to be here.

Here are a few snapshots from the day:

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COUPLE BW

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After a really nice day of wandering around, I stopped into a little brassiere for a bit of refreshment. I met some locals who taught me some new French words, and I taught them some English. We were having a terrific time.

There were only a few of us in the place for quite a while, but after around six o’clock, it started getting really busy. I had been looking up information on my iPhone all day, checking in on foursquare, etc., but I always put it back in my bag when I was finished. Except one time.

At one point late in the day, I had been using my phone, and then needed to grab something out of my handbag. So I laid my phone down on the table, and then when I went to grab my phone again, it was gone. GONE. Someone swiped it right then and there. Unbelievable!

In the States we have our phones out all the time, and no one seems to bother them. I was shocked and upset. But that wasn’t the half of it.  Busses stop running to my little village pretty early, so I had planned to take a taxi home that evening; the problem was – I had the address of where I was staying on my iPhone – so I didn’t know how to direct the cab driver on where to go.

To say the least I was pretty upset and a little scared. It was now dark, I had no idea how to make it home. After wracking my brain on what to do, I remembered my local phone, and called Catherine! (Thank goodness we programmed her number into the phone before I left Paris.)  She texted the address to my local phone, but I was so taken-a-back by the fact that my iPhone was stolen, I couldn’t really manage speaking in French to the driver to tell him anything. Remember, this is my FIRST day out in AIX by myself.

Catherine was such a good friend — she talked to the driver for me and proceeded to stay on the phone with him until we arrived home – giving point by point directions and making sure I made it safely. Seriously, I do not know what I would have done without her.

What a hard lesson to learn my first week. After talking to a few other people, I guess there is quite a market for smart phones here and you cannot set it down at all without your eyes on it at all times.  I’ve heard stories where these thief’s will actually steal it right out of your hands while walking down the street.

Thankfully my phone is insured, but trying to get a new phone while in Europe may prove to be a little difficult, and I may have to wait until I get back to Paris where there is an AT&T Worldwide office.

August 11

Needless to say, I stayed home today. I swam in the pool and got my bearing’s back.

To be continued…

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France: Week One – Part One: Paris

Well, I’ve been in France for one full week. And when I say full, I mean FULL. I have had ups and downs, sunshine and rain, met some wonderful people and have stretched my comfort zone to new limits.

Due to all this, I haven’t had a chance or the energy to post a blog yet, so I’ll try to get you up to date on what’s been happening.

Week One, Part One – Paris

Tuesday, August 6
It all started uneventfully. I arrived at the Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris well rested (I actually slept on the plane), caught the Roissybus to the 8th arrondissement (the Opera and incredible shopping), where I’d be staying for the first couple of days with my Parisian friend Catherine before heading down south to AIX for the first month of my sabbatical.

She met me at the bus drop off  and we went on to her home. This is the same apartment I rented the last time I was in Paris, so everything felt familiar and I was comfortable and happy.  Catherine had a lovely lunch prepared, so we dined at the apartment before heading out for a walk around the city.

It was a gorgeous day in Paris – sunny and warm. It was wonderful to see my friend and catch  up on what has been happening in each others lives since we last saw each other.

Wednesday, August 7
I awoke this morning to the sounds heavy rain and thunder outside my shuttered windows. Catherine had already been out to the pâtisserie and had a nice breakfast of pain au chocolat, croissant, coffee, and orange juice waiting for me when I finally ventured out of my bedroom and into the kitchen.

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travel lessons

Following breakfast I took a shower and started to get ready for the day.

This is where travel lesson#1 comes in; something I thought I had learned years ago, but I guess I didn’t or I wasn’t thinking clearly due to jet lag.  ** Yea let’s go with that one! **  🙂

I plugged my straight-iron into a plug adapter and not an electrical voltage converter, and burned off a  nice section of my hair.

It looks far worse than it was. Fortunately I didn’t lose too much hair, and thankfully there was no bald spot. Once I got over the shock of it all, we ended up having a great laugh over it and a good lesson was learned.

After that little issue, Catherine and I set out to purchase a cell phone from a local carrier that I could use while in France, to make calls, text, etc. without having to use my iPhone International Plan for local calls. (This will come in handy later in the week when my iPhone is stolen and I have to find my way home in AIX without the address – since it was in my iPhone… but I digress.)

After lunch Catherine and I went our separate ways, and I spent the rest of the afternoon wandering around Paris in the rain, stopping at a few locations I wanted to visit on this trip, specifically related to my novel.

First stop: Closerie des Lilas

Closerie des Lilas

Closerie des Lilas

In the latter part of the 19th century, Impressionists Auguste Renoir, Claude Monet, and Frederic Bazille began to leave Montmartre and its crowds, and spent their time in Montparnasse and frequented this Café. Situated on the route from Paris to Orleans, the Closerie also served as a stage-coach stop, and the owner rented out rooms to passing travelers.

A little snack

A little snack

While here, I had a light snack, then wrote a little and just enjoyed the afternoon, listening to the sounds of the raindrops hitting the canvas roof of  restaurant’s terrace.

Next, I took a leisurely walk through Jardin du Luxembourg the second largest public park in Paris, located in the 6th arrondissement. The park is the garden of the French Senate, which is housed in the Luxembourg Palace.

Jardin du Luxembourg

Jardin du Luxembourg

Paris August 2013 038

Jardin du Luxembourg

Jardin du Luxembourg

Jardin du Luxembourg

Then on to meet Catherine for dinner at Le Relais de l’Entrecôte, a wonderful little gem in Saint-Germain for steak frites (although it’s become so popular they now have three locations in Paris and another in Geneva). This is a delicious but no non-sense dining experience, and there is always a line (they do not take reservations).

Le_Relais_de_l'Entrecote

Le Relais de l’Entrecôte

The meal is simple. Salad with walnuts, steak and fries. There are only three decisions: 1) how would you like your steak 2) what wine and 3) what for desert (profiterole s’il vous plait!).

Steak Frites

Steak Frites

But it’s the special “Secret” sauce on the steak (good for dipping fries as well) that will keep you coming back for more. Oh, and don’t worry, if you are still hungry after your first plate, they will bring you a second helping of steak and fries.

We finished our meal and then took a drive around Paris to see some of the sights, that no matter how many times you’ve seen them, you want to see them again; not to mention Paris is so beautiful at night.

We concluded the evening at the Eiffel Tower, just on time for the hourly light show.

Paris August 2013 102

We got a little artsy with the next photo, Catherine’s idea, quite fun:

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower

Well, that’s it for Paris, for now, tomorrow I’m off to AIX en Provence!

(I’ll be back in Paris in September.)

to be continued…

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Strasbourg: Capital of Alsace

Bicycle in the Garden – photo by D. GRINNELL

As the European capital and France’s seventh-largest city, located at a crossroads between the Latin and Germanic cultures, Strasbourg has a unique architectural heritage. Built alongside the river Rhine, boasting a 2000-year history and a town centre listed as Unesco World Heritage, this attractive town skillfully combines tradition with modernity and can be explored on foot, by riverboat, by tram… and even by bicycle. Strasbourg and its surroundings have a 500 km network of cycle trails: the largest in all of France!

Cyclists can discover the town and its surrounding area in original and highly unusual manner as they travel along the canals, through the parks and gardens, and through the town’s historical pedestrianized center. *

Alsatian specialties

Alsatian Specialties – photo by Y. NOTO-CAMPANELLA

The capital of Alsace is rightly famous for its delicious cuisine, wine and beer.

strasbourg

La Petite France – photo by B. NAEGELEN

This is the part of the town that immediately springs to mind when people think of Strasbourg. Formerly the fishermen’s, millers’ and tanners’ district, La Petite France is today a peaceful tourist district in the heart of Strasbourg. The narrow streets offer a wealth of half-timbered houses dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, huge interior courtyards, and large sloping roofs opening out onto lofts where animal hides were once dried.

The following photos were taken by me in mid-October, so it was pretty cold; even so, many people were out and about, enjoying all this city has to offer.

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Postcard perfect – photo by D. GRINNELL

This picture perfect café called Au Fond de Jardin was quite inviting.

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Sweet puppy – Photo by D. GRINNELL

This adorable puppy patiently awaited as his owner stepped into the wine shop. Keeping so still, he appeared as a fixture. Anticipating viewers would not believe he was real, I snapped a couple of pictures when he moved his head. I love the fact that this quintessential French man sauntered into the frame with his bike at just the right time.

Paris.Mulhouse.Strasbourg 279

Puppy and Frenchman with Bike – photo by D. GRINNELL

1Strasbourg carousel

Carousel – photo by D. GRINNELL

I love that many French cities have a beautiful Carousel in the town square. Strasbourg was no different. I’m sure in the warmer months it’s full of giggling children with huge smiles on their faces.

1Strasbourg band

Trio – photo by D. GRINNELL

This sweet trio filled the cold air with the lovely sounds of old French songs.

1Strasbourg spout

Gothic storm drain spout – photo by D. GRINNELL

And you’ve just got to love this… in France even the storm drain spouts are artistic.

I am looking forward to visiting this lovely city again, this time in the warmer time of year, and perhaps venturing off on a cycling tour. Stay tuned…

NOTE: Content and some photos (those not by D. Grinnell) were provided by the Strasbourg’s Office of Tourism (complete contact information below) in their Press file. For more information on city or the surrounding areas of Alsace, please check out their website.

OFFICE DE TOURISME DE STRASBOURG ET SA REGION
17 place de la Cathédrale – B.P. 70020 – 67082 STRASBOURG
Tel. +33 (0)3 88 52 28 28 – Fax: +33 (0)3 88 52 28 29
E-mail: info@otstrasbourg.fr – Internet: www.otstrasbourg.fr

*For more information on cycling:

Esprit Cycles

Tel. + 33   (0)3 88 36 18 41

www.espritcycles.com

Vél’hop

Tel. + 33 (0)3 88 23 56 75 or + 33   (0)3 88 35 44 65

www.velhop.strasbourg.eu

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